In 1974 Elaine was the first (and only) woman to lead the Black Panther Party. So what did the Black Panthers and Huey Johnson, an environmentalist, have in common? A lot, as we will learn in this interview between Huey and Elaine. Elaine shares the lessons she learned from Huey Johnson and how they have influenced her life's work. She explains her current project aimed to create opportunities for those with "extreme barriers to employment" such as former inmates, disabled people and others. Her passion and spirit should inspire us all.

Pete Dangermond, former Director of California State Parks shares his ideas about park planning and how parks provide an important resource for youth.

What is corporate responsibility? Why is it important? Yvon Chouinard, founder of Patagonia, Inc shares his story about how a young French Canadian boy, an avid outdoorsman, became a mountain climber, a blacksmith, and the founder of Patagonia, Inc. Yvon co-created the program, 1% for the Planet as a payment for the use of resources in his clothing. Hear the story of Patagonia's success and the philosophy of the man who built the company.

How did a quiet young woman from Kansas City end up participating in a global movement to ensure that women had ownership over their production and reproduction, and how did she help to assemble and lead an institution to accomplish this? In 1957, Michaela followed her dreams to New York City where she was employed in the male dominated world of finance at Merrill Lynch. This was the first step in her awareness that women did not have the same access to money as men did. Michaela tells the story about the origin of Women's World Banking, a global institution that has granted micro loans to women in Africa, Asia, Latin America, Europe, and North America. This institution has improved the lives of women, their communities, and families throughout the world.

Why shouldn't we have a future with as much to offer as the present? A six term Idaho State Senator, Mary Lou Reed talks about being a female representative in the the mostly male senate chambers in 1984. She discusses the 1975 Land Use Planning Act that she fought for with the Idaho Conservation League, and the many issues that are close to her heart such as community, land and water conservation, diversity in Idaho, and human and women's rights.

Biologist and educator, Nona Dennis, talks about the human role in wilderness protection and management; she poses some questions as to how we might manage our wilderness areas in the face of climate change. Nona speaks about the future of environmentalism, about environmental heroics, and how she has contributed to the environmental field as a consultant and educator, as President of the Marin Conservation League, and now as a retired environmental consultant.