Michael Dombeck is well known for his dedication to responsible stewardship of America's public lands. He has served as Acting Director of the Bureau of Land Management and as the Chief of the U.S. Forest Service.  He is also an educator and scientist. He is a University of Wisconsin (UW) Fellow and a retired Professor of Global Conservation at UW.  In this video conversation with Huey Johnson, Mr. Dombeck discusses his professional accomplishments with the Roadless Rule and why this Rule was so important in managing public lands for future generations.

John Leshy is the distinguished emeritus law professor (U.C. Hastings College of the Law, San Francisco) known for his expertise in federal land use laws: water law, Indian law, and mining law among others. He has advised both the Clinton and Obama administrations and served as the Solicitor (General Council) for the U.S. Department of the Interior during the Clinton administration. Dr. Leshy shares his views concerning the management of our public trust lands and some of the challenges we face. He explains why it is essential to keep these lands in the public domain.

Native American, John Echohawk, tells his story of how and why he went to law school and how he became one of the best advocates for Native American rights in the country.

A lifelong activist for wilderness, a wholesome environment, and peace and social justice, Michael Frome, at age 95, has stories to tell. A strong and principled journalist since the 1960s, he is one to tell the truth about our public lands and parks. He has always been passionate about telling stories about the management of federal public lands. His stories and reports have been published in a variety of newspapers and magazines. He is also a prolific author of many books as well. Because of his outspoken views on the threats to public lands, he was fired from several jobs. However, he would not be silenced, he continued to report on topics such as clear cutting forests and the influence of logging, grazing, mining and hydropower threats to public lands.

What is a SLAPP suit? How does it affect individuals who are trying to participate in the review of a project? Attorney, Joseph Brecher, has helped many activists and regular folks who have been sued because they fought a proposal that they felt was wrong. Joe helps us to better understand this malicious technique.

Tom Turner, an editor with EarthJustice, tells the story about the Roadless Rule, which establishes prohibitions on road construction, road reconstruction, and timber harvesting on 58.5 million acres of inventoried roadless areas on National Forest System lands. Tom shares how the U.S. Forest Service's Roadless Rule originated with RARE (Roadless Area Review and Evaluation), how it merged into RARE II, and was successfully challenged by the State of California Resources Agency, to finally emerge years later as the Roadless Rule. Tom explains that EarthJustice had a unique role in defending this rule at a time when the federal government was absent.