What does an environmental attorney do to protect the environment? Plenty! Mike Sherwood shares a few stories of his legal work in Hawaii (in the U.S. Attorney's office) and from his private practice in California. In Hawaii he helped to protect Honolulu harbor from oil spills from large shipping companies and he prosecuted trespassers on remote Hawaii Islands. His diligence in protecting the ancient redwood forests paid off with the addition of important heritage forests to Redwood National Park in northern California.

John Amodio moved to the north coast of California, where the giant old growth redwood trees are found, to attend Humboldt State University. Soon he and a small band of students were inspired by Dr. Rudi Becking, a European trained ecologists, to finding a way to expand the recently created Redwood National Park, whose boundaries were a political compromise that were destroying the integrity of the Park.  As part of the Emerald Creek Committee, John played a central role in elevating the issue and spent more than a year in Washington, D.C.  organizing and lobbying, mentored by Representative Phil Burton, the legislative genius behind the successful Park expansion.

   

She is a mother, a volunteer, guardian, author and rebel who thinks big! In 1970, Amy Meyer decided to dedicate her free time to preserve land that in 1972 would become the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.  Amy tells a story about her role in protecting one of the largest contiguous pieces of land surrounding a major urban area - over 80,000 acres! For more on this topic, you may want to watch the excellent documentary film: Rebels With a Cause by Nancy Kelly and Kenji Yamamoto and read Amy's book, New Guardians for the Golden Gate, published by UC Press.

Wonderful story told by Joe Garbarino Jr., a self-described scavenger, now Chairman of the Board of Marin Sanitary Service (MSS). Joe shares the story of his beginnings with MSS and explains how he started one of the first and most successful recycling programs in the state of California. Marin Sanitary's recycling program currently recycles up to 75% percent of the collected solid waste. Joe also shares his plastic bag story; it will make you smile. Because of his dedication and success in recycling, Joe admits he has become an environmentalist along the way. Joe is now on the quest to find additional and more creative ways to recycle the last 25% of the waste left over from the MSS collection.

A story about how a small handful of people defeated a nuclear reactor project at Bodega Head (1958-1964). This project was forced on citizens of California's North Coast by the state's largest utility, its largest university, and one of the largest and most powerful government agencies in existence at the time. Hear David Pesonen's story about how he learned about the corruption and danger that was lurking behind this sinister project at Bodega Head and how a small group of active citizens put it to rest forever. At the Bodega Head north of San Francisco, California, one can observe the actual "Hole in the Head" where PG&E had excavated the footings for the nuclear plant right alongside the San Andreas Fault.

Nadananda listens for spiritual guidance every day, and pays attention to messages. One day she heard that the Eel River was dead and the news unexpectedly cut her to the core. She decided to get involved in a big way. Nadananda, tells her story about founding Friends of the Eel River and her inspiration to wage a battle to protect water resources for fish and wildlife.