John Leshy is the distinguished emeritus law professor (U.C. Hastings College of the Law, San Francisco) known for his expertise in federal land use laws: water law, Indian law, and mining law among others. He has advised both the Clinton and Obama administrations and served as the Solicitor (General Council) for the U.S. Department of the Interior during the Clinton administration. Dr. Leshy shares his views concerning the management of our public trust lands and some of the challenges we face. He explains why it is essential to keep these lands in the public domain.

Learn how Joseph Brecher, in 1970, found his way into environmental law. He tells his story about the wilderness case of Admiralty Island in Alaska. Yes, this was worth the fight!  

Tom Turner, an editor with EarthJustice, tells the story about the Roadless Rule, which establishes prohibitions on road construction, road reconstruction, and timber harvesting on 58.5 million acres of inventoried roadless areas on National Forest System lands. Tom shares how the U.S. Forest Service's Roadless Rule originated with RARE (Roadless Area Review and Evaluation), how it merged into RARE II, and was successfully challenged by the State of California Resources Agency, to finally emerge years later as the Roadless Rule. Tom explains that EarthJustice had a unique role in defending this rule at a time when the federal government was absent.

Businessman and Stanford alumnus, Alvin Duskin shares his wisdom about how to live life with heart, passion and fun. Living in San Francisco in the 1970s, Alvin decided to get involved in community issues and he enjoyed recognition and success for his political activism. He later went on to work at the Senate Energy Committee and became a pioneer in renewable energy and carbon capture.

Carol Moss, a resident of Malibu California, speaks about her love of nature and the importance of the natural environment for those that live in the city.  She explains some lessons that she has learned about stewardship from the Tibetan people and how their way of living could be helpful in caring for our resources.

Ed Ueber, a former sanctuary manager (Gulf of the Farallones, Cordell Bank) with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has been integral to ocean management and policy since the 1970s. He has worked successfully with fisherman, political figures, and shipping interests to protect ocean life. Ed shares his wisdom about the ocean, our relationship to it, and how we successfully can work with people who disagree with us.