A lifelong activist for wilderness, a wholesome environment, and peace and social justice, Michael Frome, at age 95, has stories to tell. A strong and principled journalist since the 1960s, he is one to tell the truth about our public lands and parks. He has always been passionate about telling stories about the management of federal public lands. His stories and reports have been published in a variety of newspapers and magazines. He is also a prolific author of many books as well. Because of his outspoken views on the threats to public lands, he was fired from several jobs. However, he would not be silenced, he continued to report on topics such as clear cutting forests and the influence of logging, grazing, mining and hydropower threats to public lands.

Founder of the Trust for Public Land (TPL), Huey Johnson, interviews Will Rogers, president and CEO of TPL, about his role in land conservation, his passion for bee keeping and his natural leadership skills. Will shares why parks in the urban environment are so essential to urban living and how TPL helps to create these critical urban open spaces.  Will shares his thoughts about leadership and risk taking within the context of land conservation.

John Amodio moved to the north coast of California, where the giant old growth redwood trees are found, to attend Humboldt State University. Soon he and a small band of students were inspired by Dr. Rudi Becking, a European trained ecologists, to finding a way to expand the recently created Redwood National Park, whose boundaries were a political compromise that were destroying the integrity of the Park.  As part of the Emerald Creek Committee, John played a central role in elevating the issue and spent more than a year in Washington, D.C.  organizing and lobbying, mentored by Representative Phil Burton, the legislative genius behind the successful Park expansion.

   

To some, our love of nature begins with catching a fish. Ane Deister experienced her love of nature this way and that love grew into a successful career in environmental engineering. As the Assistant Secretary of California Resources during the early Jerry Brown administration in Sacramento, Ms. Deister led the Resources Agency by applying the principles of net energy accounting. Ane explains how environmental engineering combined with the ability to clearly communicate are essential skills that can be applied to solve difficult problems.

Carol Moss, a resident of Malibu California, speaks about her love of nature and the importance of the natural environment for those that live in the city.  She explains some lessons that she has learned about stewardship from the Tibetan people and how their way of living could be helpful in caring for our resources.

She is a mother, a volunteer, guardian, author and rebel who thinks big! In 1970, Amy Meyer decided to dedicate her free time to preserve land that in 1972 would become the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.  Amy tells a story about her role in protecting one of the largest contiguous pieces of land surrounding a major urban area - over 80,000 acres! For more on this topic, you may want to watch the excellent documentary film: Rebels With a Cause by Nancy Kelly and Kenji Yamamoto and read Amy's book, New Guardians for the Golden Gate, published by UC Press.