Michael Dombeck is well known for his dedication to responsible stewardship of America's public lands. He has served as Acting Director of the Bureau of Land Management and as the Chief of the U.S. Forest Service.  He is also an educator and scientist. He is a University of Wisconsin (UW) Fellow and a retired Professor of Global Conservation at UW.  In this video conversation with Huey Johnson, Mr. Dombeck discusses his professional accomplishments with the Roadless Rule and why this Rule was so important in managing public lands for future generations.

John Leshy is the distinguished emeritus law professor (U.C. Hastings College of the Law, San Francisco) known for his expertise in federal land use laws: water law, Indian law, and mining law among others. He has advised both the Clinton and Obama administrations and served as the Solicitor (General Council) for the U.S. Department of the Interior during the Clinton administration. Dr. Leshy shares his views concerning the management of our public trust lands and some of the challenges we face. He explains why it is essential to keep these lands in the public domain.

Native American, John Echohawk, tells his story of how and why he went to law school and how he became one of the best advocates for Native American rights in the country.

Ken tells the story of how he started his career to become one of the foremost environmental writers today.  As the eldest son of environmentalist, David Brower, Ken developed an early love of wilderness and was able to convey his thoughts eloquently in writing. In this video, Ken talks about his writing, some ideas concerning wilderness, and reminisces about his famous father. Among Ken's published environmental works are two very unique biographies: one about the scientist Freeman Dyson and his son, George (The Starship and the Canoe) and the other, a biography of his father (The Wildness Within), which kicked off a one-year celebration of David Brower's 100th birthday.  

Tom Turner, an editor with EarthJustice, tells the story about the Roadless Rule, which establishes prohibitions on road construction, road reconstruction, and timber harvesting on 58.5 million acres of inventoried roadless areas on National Forest System lands. Tom shares how the U.S. Forest Service's Roadless Rule originated with RARE (Roadless Area Review and Evaluation), how it merged into RARE II, and was successfully challenged by the State of California Resources Agency, to finally emerge years later as the Roadless Rule. Tom explains that EarthJustice had a unique role in defending this rule at a time when the federal government was absent.

For over 30 years, Joanna Rogers Macy has been teaching in workshops and trainings that help people move through their despair and denial about nuclear proliferation and ecological destruction and to act with a renewed sense of purpose. In this interview, she highlights the paradox of our material worldview, and the joy of greening the self, seeing ourselves as part of earth's ecology, which she has written about extensively.